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and that cities are key to the economy. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, we've had high-profile examples of public-private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. one reason we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money, but to provide oversight, you have somebody to go to when you have a project, a regulator. an interlocutor. we should alloy private money. there's an additional problem. about so-called eminent domain. you can't just clear things out in china they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving. we're building a road here. you got to move out of your apartment tomorrow. we can't do that. it makes it trickier in our older cities to rebuild in the way they did in china. >> it's an interesting analo
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state governments. it is good to have them close. i can see what they're doing and to buy and put and see what i can do for the people of the city. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and how it can be impacted. joining us for the discussion is josh . caller: it is a combination of a federal and state program. it usually lasts -- it can be extended up to 93 weeks. it is the extension be on the six month time frame we're talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. host: that is what might be caught -- cut? guest: that is what automatically expires. president obama has said as part of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. republicans have not taken a firm stand. we have seen in the past obama has had to make a deal on taxes. host: what specific benefits do these programs provide? guest: usually some kind o
and advised all manners of clients in the real world of new york city. businesses, large and small, and individuals. as a true generalist, she has tried a wide variety of cases and her professional accomplishments and accolades are numerous, including serving as head of the litigation section, the largest section of the american bar association. she was, in fact, a pioneer in this position as the first asian-american to hold this prestigious post. second, on the point of moderation. when i mess miss schofield, i was struck -- met miss schofield, i was struck by the fact that she has one singular agenda -- the preservation of the rule of law. indeed, her professional work has been devoted to the general improvement of the practice of law and to zealously representing her clients in the best and most ethical traditions of the profession. evidence of her moderation can be found in the support she has across the political spectrum. both democrats and republicans have called notice tell me what a great -- me to tell me what a great judge she'll make. she's done everything from teaching
is in the community development block grant. that is a block grant that cities use largely. it is very flexible. they can use it to help in their recovery efforts in the most flexible way possible host: new mexico has two air force bases, two national research allowance, and many folks are dependent on federal money for work and assistance programs. for her. -- it will hurt. , democratic caller. caller: explain the logic behind what taxing one of our biggest corporations, which is the religious work -- religious churches and all of that that make $10 trillion a year. and also, how come medicare pays for -- i think it is $1 billion now -- a formula enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. -- for male enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. host: independent caller, go ahead. caller: i would like to bring up the point that you have brought of the federal portion of the moneys and the money does not go -- come out of nowhere. that is the tax dollars, or has been borrowed, were printed. that money is not without cost. i would like to have your opinion on that. thet: you're refe
. she is still at large. deadly subway pushing in less than a month in new york city. there is no deal yet for the fiscal cliff. but for now we have at least avoided the container cliff. 15,000 dock workers at 15 major u.s. ports and port owners agreeing to extend an expired contract for 30 days. the main issue is container royalties. the heavier the container the more dock workers get paid. owners want to cap payments. a strike would have meant higher prices on many goods like clothing, auto goods and electronic products because they would have been in short supply. emma lou harris could be in trouble with the law. tmz reports that harris is accused of hitting another car on a highway then driving off. the l.a. county d.a. is deciding whether harris will face any charges. in one was hurt. a rep for the singer says it was so minor harris didn't even know she hit the other car. and those are your headlines. >> thank you, juliet. let's talk about this story because this is outrageous. >> dave: unbelievable. >> juliet: sick. >> clayton: here is what vladimir putin did in response to the u
festivals' columbus, ohio they used the money to buy an underwater machinery. host: and in the kansas city, they purchased in bomb detection -- a bomb detection robots despite already having two. it sat largely unused and was brought back on line are high schoolers. let's go to our first caller. from the breezy and appeared -- from louisiana. caller: the u.s. territories, do they applied to them guest: they apply to all of federated territories as well. in some areas, there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided to those territories. host: if you like to join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes into consideration the risk. in other words, it wants to provide the money more toward portions of the country where there is a greater risk of attack or natural disaster. secondly, we look at capabilities. how
are responding to a natural disaster. host: an image of something purchase by a department in kansas city. bomb detection robot despite already having two. local officials on that one of the broken robot set largely unused four years brought brought it back on line after two high schoolers were asked to repaired which they did for only $5. hines from louisiana. good morning. caller: i have a question, as far as these grants for security threats do you do they apply to united states trust territories like micronesia -- micronesia, close to china, or is it just for the 50 states. guest: a really good question they apply to of the federated territories as well and for some of the grant programs there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided for the different territories. join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes
. there was a sharia court in the city. these are basically consider it. >> civilian councils are trying. civilian councils are trying to wrestle more and more control from the fsa. the relationship as cooperative. in large depends on whether or not it meet that. i was able to meet with the commanders. i met with the supporters. not 10[inaudible] are either criminals gangs trying to take care of the chaos or the small extreme group that is well funded. majority are severly under funded. i met to the brigade commander with not enough food to go around. there's also that aspect but who is funded and who is not. they're trying to portray themselves as the ones that are leading the fighting in aleppo. they immediately rejected the coalition. this was reported. i got in touch with the commanders. the main fighting group in a lot of but of a video. they do not represent us. they said we recognize the council. i think of them as moderates. even their experience and food shortages. this is very well funded. this logic depends on whether 0% can receive reports. >> right now and maybe the case that people i
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10